Elusive Butterfly (Bob Lind)

31 MARCH 1966


Another one of those weird 1960s things. At #5 in the UK charts this week was folk singer Bob Lind with ‘Elusive Butterfly’. At #6 was Val Doonican with the EXACT SAME SONG. Bob’s version is in the video clip below. Lind wrote this song, which also reached #5 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. Doonican's version also went to #5 in the UK.

This was Lind's biggest career hit by far, and would have done better without the direct competition. Evidently a very popular song, other versions of 'Elusive Butterfly' released in 1966 came from Petula Clark, Cher, Billy Walker, Richard Anthony, The Bachelors, Graham Bonney, Lou Christie, Johnny Mathis, and Bobby Vee!

B-side: 'Cheryl's Goin' Home' (the original A-side)
Released: November 1965 as B-side, January 1966 as A-side
Highest chart position: #5 (UK and US)
Length: 2:51
Writer: Bob Lind
Producer: Richard Bock

Elusive Butterfly (Bob Lind)

Lightnin' Strikes (Lou Christie)

30 MARCH 1966


Lou Christie’s ‘Lightnin' Strikes’ was at its peak UK chart position of #11. The song had reached #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts.

Christie had a decidedly mixed career, and his previous best seller had been 'Two Faces Have I' back in 1963, but his two releases prior to 'Lightnin' Strikes' had failed to break the top 100. This solid bit of quite melodramatic pop was to be his biggest hit, and as the co-writer it would have earned him a nice bit of money.

B-side: 'Cryin' In The Streets'
Released: December 1965
Highest chart position: #11 (UK), #1 (US)
Recorded: September 3, 1965, Olmstead Studios, New York City, New York
Length: 3:05
Label: MGM
Writers: Lou Christie, Twyla Herbert


Hey Joe (Love)

29 MARCH 1966


One more track from the self-titled album from the Los Angeles band Love, which was released during this month. This one is ‘Hey Joe’, which at the time was covered by just about every folk-rock band worth their salt and would be taken to greater heights later in the year when it became the breakthrough single for Jimi Hendrix.

The vocals here were handled by Bryan MacLean, former equipment manager for the Byrds, and the secondary singer/songwriter in Love (behind Arthur Lee).

Many garage or folk-rock bands of the time knocked out straightforward versions of this tune. This one holds up well among them, but at the end of 1966 Hendrix took 'Hey Joe' to a whole other level.

Hey Joe (Love)

Bang Bang [My Baby Shot Me Down] (Cher)

28 MARCH 1966


Cher's solo single 'Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)' reached #3 in the UK and #2 in the USA. It was written by her then-husband Sonny Bono, and became her first million-seller in the UK and her biggest-selling solo record of the 1960s.

The song, which tells a bit of a story, has been covered numerous times (perhaps most notably by Nancy Sinatra in 1966).

Released: 1966
Highest chart position: #3 (UK), #2 (US)
Recorded: 1966
Length: 2:44
Label: Imperial
Writer: Sonny Bono
Producer: Sonny Bono

Bang Bang [My Baby Shot Me Down] (Cher)

You Baby (The Turtles)

27 MARCH 1966


The Turtles’ third single ‘You Baby’ was at its peak of #20 in the US Billboard charts. Written by PF Sloan, this was also their third top 30 record there, although this song did not chart in the UK, where the Turtles were rather underrated and only had three top 20 hits (during 1967-68).

This was taken from their second album 'You Baby', which somehow failed to reach the US charts. Despite this, the Turtles went on to score another six top 20 hits in the USA and left quite a decent back catalogue of folk/pop/rock songs.


Satisfaction (Otis Redding)

26 MARCH 1966


Otis Redding's cover of 'Satisfaction' was on its way up the US Billboard Hot 100, where it peaked at #31. It also reached #3 on the R&B charts, and #33 in the UK.

The legendary three-note guitar riff is played by horns here, which is actually how Keith Richards originally intended it to be recorded. Also, Redding claimed he did not know the lyrics and so just made them up during recording. This was a solid cover that (like all decent covers) manages to present a distinctively new version of the original, but of course it can never match the Stones' original which is rightly regarded as one of the great rock songs of all time.


Baby, Scratch My Back (Slim Harpo)

25 MARCH 1966


Slim Harpo's single 'Baby, Scratch My Back' was at its peak position of #16 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. It also reached #1 on the R&B chart. This was Slim's biggest hit.

He was a Louisiana blues musician, born in 1924, and he played in the distinctive 'swamp blues' style, and there is a lot about this song that sounds like the later 'swamp rock' of Credence Clearwater Revival, who in 1966 had not yet achieved success.

Although he was clean-living, Slim died of a heart attack at the age of 46.

B-side: 'I'm Gonna Miss You (Like The Devil)'
Released: 1965
Highest chart position: #16 (US)
Recorded: J.D. Miller Studio, Crowley, Louisiana, 1965
Length: 2:47
Label: Excello (Cat. no. 2273)
Writer: James Moore aka Slim Harpo
Producer: J.D. Miller

'Baby, Scratch My Back' (Slim Harpo)

I Got You (I Feel Good) James Brown

24 MARCH 1966


James Brown’s ‘I Got You (I Feel Good)' was at its peak UK chart position of #29. The song had been released several months earlier in the USA, where it reached #3 on the Billboard charts and was at #1 for six weeks on the R&B charts.
This was the highest-charting of his 99 singles to reach the Billboard Hot 100. It has since been (over)used about 20 times in various movies and TV shows.

‘I Got You (I Feel Good)' is a good example of Brown's sound at the time, which already had a much funkier style than the soul music typically put out by the likes of Motown.

B-side: 'I Can't Help It (I Just Do-Do-Do)'
Released: October 1965
Highest chart position: #29 (UK), #3 (US)
Recorded: 6 May 1965, · Criteria Studios, Miami, FL
Length: 2:44
Label: King 6015
Writer: James Brown
Producer: James Brown

 I Got You (I Feel Good) James Brown


Sha La La La Lee (Small Faces)

23 MARCH 1966


The Small Faces’ third single ‘Sha La La La Lee’ became their biggest hit yet when the bouncing bit of fuzz-guitar driven pop reached its peak UK chart position of #3 during this week.

The band never really liked this song as they preferred a less pop-orientated sound, and had always been viewed as a serious music group in the Mod scene. It was seen by some fans as the moment that they 'sold out', despite the often brilliant songs that the Small Faces released during the following years.

This was their first record to feature Ian McLagan on keyboards. A version of this song was apparently sung by Tottenham Hotspur FC supporters, in honour of then-Spurs’ player Alan Mullery (‘Mull-Mull-Mull-ery’).

B-side: 'Grow Your Own'
Released: 28 January 1966
Highest chart position: #3 (UK)
Recorded: December 1965, IBC Studios, London
Length: 2:56
Label: Decca (US Press Records)
Producer: Kenny Lynch


No Matter What You Do (Love)

22 MARCH 1966


This is another track from the self-titled debut album from the Los Angeles folk-garage rockers Love, which was released during this month. This one is ‘No Matter What You Do’, which could quite easily have been a (grungier) Byrds' song.

Unlike a lot of early Byrds' recordings, however, Love actually played their own instruments in the studio. The Byrds relied a lot on the legendary studio musicians 'The Wrecking Crew', who also provided the music for other classic 1966 West Coast recordings by Frank Sinatra, the Monkees, the Beach Boys and The Mamas and the Papas, to name just a few.

No Matter What You Do (Love)

I Fought the Law (Bobby Fuller Four)

21 MARCH 1966


The song ‘I Fought the Law’ by the Bobby Fuller Four was at its peak US Billboard Hot 100 chart position of #9 during this week. It also reached #33 on the UK chart. It was Fullers first big hit.

It is no accident that it sounds like a Buddy Holly record, as it had originally been written and recorded in 1958/59 by Sonny Curtis, who joined the Crickets after Holly's death. This version was a re-release of a single that Fuller had brought our in 1964. was famously covered by The Clash in 1979.

Sadly, Fuller died in July 1966. He was found dead in a car outside his Hollywood apartment. The autopsy was inconclusive, noting the body had 'petechial hemorrhages' probably caused by petrol vapors and the summer heat. It was either an accident or suicide, although there has been unsupported speculation that Fuller might have been killed by Charles Manson or the LAPD, as he allegedly had a relationship to a woman linked to the Mafia. Of course, if he had been killed by the police, the irony would be huge.

B-side: 'Little Annie Lou'
Released: December 1965
Highest chart position: #9 (UK), #33 (US)
Length: 2:14
Label: Mustang
Writer: Sonny Curtis
Producer: Bob Keane

 I Fought the Law (Bobby Fuller Four)

When I'm Gone (Phil Ochs)

20 MARCH 1966


Folk singer Phil Ochs’ album ‘Phil Ochs in Concert’ was released during this month. This was the last of his original albums to be all-acoustic, a reminder of the shifting sands of the folk scene at the time.

‘When I’m Gone’ is the last song on the album (which, due to recording issues, wasn't all live). In this song he lists the worthwhile things he won't be able to do once he's dead, so 'I guess I'll have to do them while I'm here'.


Going to a Go-Go (Smokey Robinson & the Miracles)

19 MARCH 1966


The Miracles ‘Going to a Go Go’ was at its peak UK chart position of #44. Not very high for such a good song and a band that had such a massive impact on the Beatles. In the US it reached #13 on the Billboard Hot 100, and #2 on the R&B charts, and was their fifth million-selling single.

Master songwriter Smokey Robinson co-wrote this with his fellow Miracles.

B-side: 'Choosey Beggar'
Released: 6 December 1965
Highest chart position: #44 (UK), #13 (US)
Recorded: Hitsville USA (Studio A): August 17, 1965
Length: 2:50
Label: Tamla T 54127
Producer: Smokey Robinson, Pete Moore


Barbara Ann (Beach Boys)

18 MARCH 1966


The Beach Boys’ classic ‘Barbara Ann’ reaches its peak UK chart position of #3. It reached #2 on the US Billboard Hot 100 charts.

This had originally been recorded by the Regents as 'Barbara-Ann' in 1961, when it reached #13 on the Billboard chart. This version was taken from Beach Boys' 1965 album 'Beach Boys' Party!'. Until 1966 the Beach Boys, despite having a string of very memorable hits, had quite a naff stage style and released a lot of party and Christmas-type albums. It was during this year that they dropped the 'yacht club' clothing and started exploring new sounds. Although vocalist Mike Love would always remain the world's worst dancer.

Recorded: 23 September 1965, United Western Recorders, Hollywood
Released: 20 December 1965
Highest chart position: #3 (UK), #2 (US)
Length: 2:05, 3:23 (album version) 
Label: Capitol 5561
Writer: Fred Fassert
Producer: Brian Wilson


'A Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Oh Barbara Ann take my hand
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Barbara Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
You got me rockin' and a rollin'
Rockin' and a reelin' Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Went to a dance looking for romance
Saw Barbara Ann so I thought I'd take a chance
Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Oh Barbara Ann take my hand
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Barbara Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
You got me rockin' and a rollin'
Rockin' and a reelin' Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Say Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Oh Barbara Ann take my hand
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Barbara Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
You got me rockin' and a rollin'
Rockin' and a reelin' Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Tried Betty Sue
Tried Betty Lou
Tried Mary Sue but I knew she wouldn't do

Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Oh Barbara Ann take my hand
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Barbara Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
You got me rockin' and a rollin'
Rockin' and a reelin' Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann
Oh Barbara Ann take my hand
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
Barbara Ann
(Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann)
You got me rockin' and a rollin'
Rockin' and a reelin' Barbara Ann
Bar bar bar bar Barbar Ann

Barbar Ann
Barbar Ann'

The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine [Anymore] (Walker Brothers)

17 MARCH 1966


The Walker Brothers’ classic ‘The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine (Anymore)’ reached #1 in the UK charts and stayed there for four weeks. It also reached #13 on the US Billboard chart, their biggest hit in their native country (the Walker Brothers were always more popular in the UK).

This had originally been released by Frankie Valli (of the Four Seasons) in 1965 but for some reason that wasn't a big hit.

The video clip above, from 'Ready Steady Go' features a re-recorded vocal performance over a backing track. Once again drummer Gary Walker and his tiny drum kit are once again left alone to look a bit redundant on the side of the stage.

B-side: 'After the Lights Go Out'
Recorded: 9 January 1966, Philips Studios, Stanhope Place, London
Released: 15 February 1966
Highest chart position: #1 (UK), #13 (US)
Length: 3:02
Label: Philips BF 1473, Smash Records (U.S.)
Writers: Bob Crewe, Bob Gaudio
Producers: Johnny Franz, Ivor Raymonde


'Loneliness is the cloak you wear
A deep shade of blue is always there
The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
The moon ain't gonna rise in the sky
The tears are always clouding your eyes
When you're without love, baby

Emptiness is the place you're in
Nothin' to lose but no more to win
The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
The moon ain't gonna rise in the sky
The tears are always clouding your eyes 
When you're without love

Lonely, without you, baby
Girl, I need you
I can't go on

The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
(The sun ain't gonna shine anymore)
The moon ain't gonna rise in the sky
(The moon ain't gonna rise in the sky)
The tears are always clouding your eyes 
(The tears are always clouding your eyes)
(Sun ain't gonna shine anymore)
When you're without love, baby

The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
The sun ain't gonna shine anymore'

A Groovy Kind of Love (The Mindbenders)

16 MARCH 1966


Manchester band the Mindbenders' first single (as a non-backing group) was ‘A Groovy Kind of Love’ and it was at its peak UK chart position of #2 during this week in 1966. It also reached #2 in the US Billboard chart (and #1 on the Cashbox chart there). Not bad for a band whose lead singer had walked out on them mid-concert just a few months before.

The singer was Wayne Fontana, and until that point his biggest hit with the Mindbenders had been the very good 'Game of Love', which had also reached #2. He left them to pursue a solo career, Shortly afterwards they were offered this song - featuring the still-relatively-new word 'Groovy' - which had been written by Carol Bayer Sager and the 17-year-old Toni Wine.

The Mindbenders didn't have a huge career, but they outsold Fontana. Eric Stewart, the guitarist who took over lead vocals in the band, went on to bigger things with 10CC in the 1970s.

B-side: 'Love Is Good'
Released: 1965
Highest chart position: #2 (UK and US) 
Length: 1:59
Label: Fontana

Groovy Kind of Love (The Mindbenders)

'When I'm feeling blue, all I have to do
Is take a look at you, then I'm not so blue
When you're close to me, I can feel your heart beat
I can hear you breathing near my ear
Wouldn't you agree, baby you and me got a groovy kind of love

Anytime you want to you can turn me onto
Anything you want to, anytime at all
When I kiss your lips, ooh I start to shiver
Can't control the quivering inside
Wouldn't you agree, baby you and me got a groovy kind of love, oh

When I'm feeling blue, all I have to do
Is take a look at you, then I'm not so blue
When I'm in your arms, nothing seems to matter
My whole world could shatter, I don't care
Wouldn't you agree, baby you and me got a groovy kind of love
We got a groovy kind of love
We got a groovy kind of love, oh
We got a groovy kind of love'

Sock It To 'Em J.B. (Rex Garvin and the Mighty Cravers)

15 MARCH 1966


Rex Garvin and The Mighty Cravers had a minor hit in 1966 with the fantastically funky floor-filler.'Sock It To 'Em J.B. Part 1'. The 'JB' referred to in this driving Northern Soul song was James Bond, and also James Brown as it was performed in Brown's style. It was covered by British band the Specials on their 1980 album 'More Specials'.

Garvin had been singing and recording without much success since the mid-1950s.


'I told you he was coming, who?
J.B., and he’s ready to sock it to ya one time Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em Dr. No, from Russia with love, gold finger
Thunder ball, Casino Royal Soul jerk, shake your hips
Shake your body line to the ground, J.B. style
Soulful, oh mamma you doin’ it good
You doin’ it right, you doin’ it J.B. style
Soulful Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em Diamonds are forever, Moon raker
Man with the golden gun
Live and let die
Spy who loved me, you only live twice J.B’s got you doin’ the bosanova
J.B’s got you doin’ the scratch
So let me see you rock
And let me see you shake it to J.B’s rock
Soulful Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em
Sock it to ’em, sock it to ’em'

Greetings (This Is Uncle Sam) (The Monitors)

14 MARCH 1966


Motown band the Monitors had a small hit in 1966 with 'Greetings (This Is Uncle Sam)', which reached #100 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart (and #37 on the R&B charts).

This was a cover of the song by the Valadiers which had reached #89 in 1961. It was about the concerns of a young man drafted into the army, and in 1966 the Vietnam War provided a good topical background for a new version. Stylistically, this sounds remarkably like a 1961 song and therefore somewhat out of place in the rapidly-changing music scene of 1966, but the lyrics were just right for the time.

Richard Street, who later replaced Paul Williams in The Temptations, was the lead singer of the Monitors.


'Greetings, this is Uncle Sam
I want to take you to a far off land
I need you, oh, I need you
Yes, I need you to lend a helping hand

Said goodbye to all my buddies
Say hello to your new friends
'Cause you're in the army now
And your new life has just begun

I need you
Oh, I need you
Yes, I need you
To lend a helping hand

I can just see me now
With a rifle in my hand
I'm gonna have to say
Goodbye to my girl

And I hope she doesn't
Find another man
And baby, baby, while I'm away
Please, please write everyday

Oh no, no
Please don't take me, Uncle Sam
You're in the army now
Goodbye, baby, so long, friends
Goodbye, baby, I hope to see you again

I need you
(Come on, boy)
Oh, I need you
(We're gonna make a man out of you)

Yes, I need you
To lend a helping hand
(This one training)
(You're not gonna miss)

Come on, boy
What ya mean you've never heard of KP?
I don't care if it's 4 in the morning
There is a right way, a wrong way
And there's my way, you'll do it my way

Come on, boy, on the double
Get in step, boy, come on now
March, march

Your mama's a long ways off, boy
So stop your crying, march
Get in step, boy, left, right, left, right
I said get in step, boy, left'

My Baby Loves Me (Martha & the Vandellas)

13 MARCH 1966


Martha & the Vandellas (as they were still called, not yet with the 'Reeves' addition) were on their way to a #22 hit for Motown on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart with 'My Baby Loves Me'. It reached #3 on the R&B charts but did not chart in the UK.

This rather good slow-burner was basically a Martha Reeves solo, as it featured backing vocals by the Four Tops and the Andantes, but not the Vandellas. Even so, Martha rates this as her own favourite recording by the group.

B-side: 'Never Leave Your Baby's Side'
Recorded: Hitsville USA (Studio A), Detroit, Michigan; 23 August 1965
Released: 4 January 1966
Highest chart position: #22 (US)
Length: 3:06
Label: Gordy


'My baby loves me, oh yeah, my baby needs me, oh yeah
No other guy can whisper sweet things in my ear
My sweetie pie has the only sweet voice I hear, so clear

Sayin' needs me, oh yeah, my baby loves me, oh yeah
I'm tellin' you he needs me, oh yes, he does
Can't seem to see no other handsome face
There's just no cute substitute can take my baby's place

'Cause I know he needs me, oh yeah
I will never, ever give my baby no trouble
Whenever he calls me I come runnin' on the double

'Cause I know he loves me, oh yeah and he needs me, yes he does
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Now nobody can tell me the place where I'm goin' wrong, oh no
Nobody could ever erase the love so strong

'Cause I know he loves me, he told me that he needs me
I know he loves me'

Listen People (Herman's Hermits)

12 MARCH 1966


Herman’s Hermits ‘Listen People’ peaked at #3 in the US Billboard charts (their eighth consecutive Top Ten hit there). This single was not released in the UK, but the song was the B-side to the rather rubbish 'You Won't Be Leaving', which reached #20 there in April. The Hermits released seven different singles during 1966, with four in the UK and six in the US.

This song was written by Graham Gouldman (future 10CC member), but he cheated a bit by basing the melody of the verses on a hymn called 'Jesus Let Us Come to Know You'.

The video clip above is from the movie 'When the Boys Meet the Girls'.

B-side: 'Got a Feeling'
Recorded: De Lane Lea Studios, London, 16 July 1965
Released: February 1966 (US), 11 March 1966 (UK)
Highest chart position: #3 (US)
Length: 2:31
Label: MGM 13462
Writer: Graham Gouldman
Producer: Mickie Most


'Listen people to what I say
I say everybody's got to have their day

And don't you know that
Everybody's got to love somebody sometime
Everybody's got to win a heart
Everybody's got to love somebody sometime
When you do, I hope you never part

I once found love, found love just like you
But then he came, he might come to you

And don't you know that
Everybody's got to lose somebody sometime
But everybody can part
Everybody's got to lose somebody sometime
So take care that you don't lose your heart

Take my advice and you'll always find
You'll be happy all of the time
Take my advice and you will see
You'll be happy as you can be

Listen people to what I say
I say everybody's got to have their day

And don't you know that
Everybody's got to love somebody sometime
Everybody's got to win a heart
Everybody's got to love somebody sometime
When you do, I hope you never part
You never part
Listen people
Listen people'

Batman Theme (The Marketts)

11 MARCH 1966


The Marketts’ version of the ‘Batman’ TV theme was at its peak position of #17 in the US Billboard charts on this day. The TV show had commenced screening earlier in the year and was an instant hit. The theme used for the show was arranged and recorded by the brilliant Nelson Riddle, but the Marketts' recording was more in the style of their own surf music background.

This was their last charting hit single of the 1960s. Their biggest single 'Out of Limits' had reached #3 back in 1963 and was their take on the theme for the popular TV show 'The Outer Limits'.


Nowhere Man (The Beatles)

10 MARCH 1966


The Beatles’ ‘Nowhere Man’ was on its way to a peak of #3 on the US Billboard charts. Taken from the ‘Rubber Soul’ album (and arguably the best song on that album), this was not even released as a single in the UK. This was another common practice in the 1960s, when record companies would release different singles and different versions of albums in different countries. For the first few years of their recording career, the albums released by the Beatles in the US generally bore little resemblance to those issued in the UK. How many British record-buyers have heard of, for example, the US-released 'Beatles '65' album? It is unrecognisable next to 'Help' and 'Rubber Soul'.

The video clip above is from a 1966 European tour performance of 'Nowhere Man'.

B-side: 'What Goes On'
Recorded: 21–22 October 1965, EMI Studios, London
Released: 21 February 1966 (US)
Highest chart position: #3 (US)
Length: 2:44
Label: Capitol
Producer: George Martin

Nowhere Man (The Beatles)

'He's a real nowhere man
Sitting in his nowhere land
Making all his nowhere plans for nobody

Doesn't have a point of view
Knows not where he's going to
Isn't he a bit like you and me?

Nowhere Man, please listen
You don't know what you're missing
Nowhere Man, the world is at your command

He's as blind as he can be
Just sees what he wants to see
Nowhere Man can you see me at all?

Nowhere Man, don't worry
Take your time, don't hurry
Leave it all till somebody else lends you a hand

Doesn't have a point of view
Knows not where he's going to
Isn't he a bit like you and me?

Nowhere Man, please listen
You don't know what you're missing
Nowhere Man, the world is at your command

He's a real Nowhere Man
Sitting in his nowhere land
Making all his nowhere plans for nobody
Making all his nowhere plans for nobody
Making all his nowhere plans for nobody'

Hey Girl (Them)

9 MARCH 1966


Another song from the great Northern Irish band Them and their sadly uncharting second album, 'Them Again'.

This is a slower song called ‘Hey Girl’, which really gives a taste of things to come for singer Van Morrison (who wrote this one), with a lilting, pastoral sound would become his sound, especially on albums such as Astral Weeks. He would soon be embarking on his long-lasting solo career.

Hey Girl (Them)

'Let's go walking where the boats go by
And watch them sail across the bay
Let me hold your hand in the morning fog
Little child I want to walk your dog

Hey, hey girl
Hey, hey girl
You're so young
I don't know what to do

And let's go walking up that mountain slope
And look down on the city down below
I will make a fool of you

Hey, hey girl
Hey,hey girl
You're so young
You make me lose my mind'

Time Won't Let Me (The Outsiders)

8 MARCH 1966


Cleveland garage band The Outsiders' debut single 'Time Won't Let Me' was climbing up the US Billboard charts on its way to an eventual #5 spot. This proved to be their biggest success and after four top 40 hits in the US in 1966 they never broke the top 100 again.

They never had any chart success in the UK.

The Outsiders were actually a very solid live act who had played together since as an R&B combo since 1958 (as the Starfires).

B-side: 'Was It Really Real'
Recorded: 1965
Released: January 1966
Highest chart position: #5 (US)
Length: 3:00
Label: Capitol
Writers: Tom King and Chet Kelly
Producer: Tom King


'I can't wait forever
Even though you want me to
I can't wait forever
To know if you'll be true
Time won't let me
Time won't let me
Time won't let me wait too long

Can't you see I've waited too long to love you
To hold you in my arms
Time won't let me
Time won't let me
Time won't let me aw
Oh

I can't wait forever
Even though you want me to
I can't wait forever
To know if you'll be true
Time won't let me
Time won't let me
Time won't let me wait that long
It won't let me wait that long
(Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait that long)
(Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait that long)'

My Flash on You (Love)

7 MARCH 1966


The Los Angeles band Love released their self-titled debut album ‘Love’ during this month. It peaked at #57 on the US album charts. They sounded much like a grungier version of their fellow Los Angeles folk-rock band the Byrds.

The single released from this album was 'My Little Red Book', a Bacharach-David song that reached #52 on the US Billboard chart. The band never achieved great chart success, although their 1967 album 'Forever Changes' has since been recognised as one of the greatest in rock history.

The album track here is 'My Flash On You', which is one of a few from the record that I prefer to the single. Lots of chiming treble on the rhythm-driven riff, and a decent garage pop song which - like so many 'unknown' songs of this period - could have been a hit with a 'bigger' band or better production or marketing.

My Flash on You (Love)

'I don't want to be in your company
I don't need you to take care of me
Let me alone, let me alone, let me alone, can't you let me be
All I want in this world is to say I'm a man that's free

People talk about the way I look
I say come on and say it, I got enough to write a book
But don't they know, don't they know, don't they know it's a waste of breath'
Cause I don't want to be like them, all I want is to be myself
(Lemme hear you play it one time now)

Don't try to force your smuggled drugs my way
'Cause baby, I cleansed my soul and I say that's the way it's gonna stay
But you can put me down, all around, on the ground, anyway you choose
Get your kicks with your fix, but this time I know it's you who lose'

Call Me (Chris Montez)

6 MARCH 1966


Chris Montez’s single ‘Call Me’ peaked at #22 on the US Billboard charts in March 1966. It also reached #2 on the US Easy Listening charts, but failed to chart in the UK.

This was considered a something of a comeback for Chris (real name Ezekiel Christopher Montanez), who had a big hit with 'Let's Dance' in 1962 but then basically dropped out of the music business. He was persuaded to record again by the great Herb Alpert. It was Herb who suggested that Chris adopt his high tenor voice for an 'easy listening' approach, as opposed to his earlier 'Chicano Rock' style. It worked a treat as Chris went on to have four decent hits in 1966.

This song had been written by Tony Hatch and originally recorded as an album and EP track by Petula Clark in 1965. Another version was released in the UK in 1966 by Lulu, which also failed to chart.


'If you're feelin' sad and lonely
There's a service I can render
Tell the one who loves you only
I can be so warm and tender

Call me, don't be afraid, you can call me
Maybe it's late but just call me
Tell me and I'll be around

When it seems your friends desert you
There's somebody thinking of you
I'm the one who never hurt you
Maybe that's because I love you

Now don't forget me 'cause if you let me
I will always stay by you
You've got to trust me, that's how it must be
There's so much that I can do

If you call I'll be right with you
You and I should be together
Take this love I long to give you
I'll be at your side forever'

Ballad of the Green Berets (Barry Sadler)

5 MARCH 1966


Barry Sadler’s ‘Ballad of the Green Berets’ topped the US Billboard Hot 100 charts this week. It might have shamelessly served as tough-guy, square-jawed recruitment propaganda, but it did the job and stayed in the #1 position for five weeks, becoming the top-selling single of 1966 in that country (although some charts had it tied with 'California Dreaming' for that honour). It also reached #24 in the UK.

This was a big reminder that not every Vietnam War song of the 1960s was anti-war, and it no doubt inspired many a young lad to sign up (and possibly end up dead, maimed or suffering PTSD). No offence to Sgt Sadler, a combat medic who had been on the front line and was the real deal, although his life story is ultimately tragic.

B-side: 'Letter from Vietnam'
Released: January 1966
Highest chart position: #24 (UK), #1 (US)
Length: 2:27
Label: RCA Victor
Producer: Andy Wiswell


'Fighting soldiers from the sky
Fearless men who jump and die
Men who mean just what they say
The brave men of the Green Beret

Silver wings upon their chest
These are men, America's best
One hundred men we'll test today
But only three win the Green Beret

Trained to live, off nature's land
Trained in combat, hand to hand
Men who fight by night and day
Courage deep, from the Green Beret

Silver wings upon their chest
These are men, America's best
One hundred men we'll test today
But only three win the Green Beret

Back at home a young wife waits
Her Green Beret has met his fate
He has died for those oppressed
Leaving her this last request

Put silver wings on my son's chest
Make him one of America's best
He'll be a man they'll test one day
Have him win the Green Beret'

Substitute (The Who)

4 MARCH 1966


The Who released their single ‘Substitute’ on this day. It reached #5 on the UK charts, but did not chart in the US (where even 'My Generation' had only reached #74).

This song shows off the Who's strengths really well. Moon's drumming, Entwistle's loud, bouncing bass lines, Pete Townsend's guitar work, and Daltrey does a decent job with the vocals. Most of all though, it's the songwriting. Townsend wasn't one for 'I-love-you-la-la-la' songs and almost always came up with interesting lyrics, be they about pinball, Lily Langtree, or generational conflict. Substitute has a lot of brilliant lines, such as 'I was born with a plastic spoon in my mouth', and 'Substitute, you for my mum, I'll least I'll get my washing done'. You couldn't get away with 'I look all white but my dad was black' nowadays, and even back then that line was changed to 'I try walking forward but my feet walk back.' for the US release.

Surprisingly, the Who never had a UK #1 single.

B-side: 'Circles (Instant Party)' (UK); 'Waltz for a Pig' (US)
Recorded: 12 February 1966, Olympic Studios, London
Released: 4 March 1966 (UK), 5 April 1966 (US)
Highest chart position: #5 (UK)
Length: 3:47, 2:59 (US)
Label: Reaction (UK), Atco (US)
Writer: Pete Townshend
Producer: Pete Townshend


'You think we look pretty good together
You think my shoes are made of leather

But I'm a substitute for another guy
I look pretty tall but my heels are high
The simple things you see are all complicated
I look pretty young, but I'm just back-dated, yeah

Substitute your lies for fact
I can see right through your plastic mac
I look all white, but my dad was black
My fine-looking suit is really made out of sack

I was born with a plastic spoon in my mouth
The north side of my town faced east, and the east was facing south
And now you dare to look me in the eye
Those crocodile tears are what you cry
It's a genuine problem, you won't try
To work it out at all you just pass it by, pass it by

Substitute me for him
Substitute my coke for gin
Substitute you for my mum
At least I'll get my washing done

But I'm a substitute for another guy
I look pretty tall but my heels are high
The simple things you see are all complicated
I look pretty young, but I'm just backdated, yeah

I was born with a plastic spoon in my mouth
The north side of my town faced east, and the east was facing south
And now you dare to look me in the eye
Those crocodile tears are what you cry
It's a genuine problem, you won't try
To work it out at all you just pass it by, pass it by

Substitute me for him
Substitute my coke for gin
Substitute you for my mum
At least I'll get my washing done

Substitute your lies for fact
I can see right through your plastic mac
I look all white, but my dad was black
My fine-looking suit is really made out of sack'